Monday, September 17

at the cabin: the first days

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When we arrived it was raining. The temperatures were cold and I did a lot of hand-washing of Cedar's things so he would have fresh clothes to wear since he's growing so fast and most of what I brought was short-sleeved. One night the temperatures dropped to 6*C (42*F) and we bought a space heater in town in the anticipation of a cold night. I woke repeatedly to check on Cedar's hands, which were indeed cold, but with the rest of him snuggled deep in fleece, he didn't seem to mind.


Each evening at the golden hour, when the pines glowed peach and orange and gold, Tim and I went out with the camera and did little shoots. I will love forever some of the shots he got of Cedar and I. The trick is to take many, many shots ~ sometimes over 300 ~ by holding down the shutter release, and then to go through them later and weed out the poor ones (most of them) and revel delightedly in the gems. 


On the way to the cabin, past Canadian Customs, I pulled over when I saw a painted turtle crossing the road. It was Cedar's first turtle sighting. If you ever do want to assist a turtle in crossing the road, make sure you carry it to the side it's trying to get to, otherwise it'll turn around and try to cross again. I carried it across a not-very-busy-road, just to make sure it would make it, and set its beautiful black and crimson self down among the grasses.


We turned our phones off all week and I didn't miss them one bit.


We did our grocery shopping the first day in a torrential downpour, soaking my moccassins and the bottoms of my jeans. The babe slept contentedly, not knowing or caring as long as he was snuggled up against me. In the car again he was smiley and cheeky ~ a soft warm baby is one of the best things. We stopped for currant scones and warm coffee and heard a lady dash off into the raindrops stating resignedly, "Never mind, we've met before."


The tall lush fields were filled with yellowing milkweed and goldenrod tufts and purple aster. We saw a coyote and then later a family of baby turkeys grazing in the damp spaces.


The loons were at the lake. The cabin smelled like it should. Warm and soft pants were applied and hot tea made. We unpacked our little bags and goodies into the nooks and counters and made ourselves at home. The rain cleared and the sky filled with flat white clouds as far as I could see. A yellow woodpecker with a black velvet collar picked something off the ground outside the window before it caught my eye and swooped off.  The wind turned chilly and we made plans to go to the pancake house in the sugar bush the next morning. We started the Scrabble game which was to last for five days (Scrabble with an infant around...). The beaver swam by down by the dock.


We had arrived.






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